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Thread: First Aid

  1. #31
    Site Sponsor D2Reid's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=tedzz9;141405]
    Quote Originally Posted by D2Reid View Post
    and drinking less alcohol.[/QUOTE]

    WHAT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Yea I know, the only upside is you don't need to drink the same amount at altitude to have a similar affect.
    Dallas

  2. #32
    So let me get this straight. When you get high you drink less to get as high as you were when you were low? Could be a win - win.

    As a lowlander I experienced some of the symptoms of altitude sickness when visiting friends in Denver. They took us to Pikes Peak the next day. Short of breath, ringing ears, headache, weak and a little queasy. Zero altitude to 14,000ft in 24hrs was a bit much.
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  3. #33
    Site Sponsor tedzz9's Avatar
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    Copied from Stroke.org

    Use F.A.S.T. to Remember the Warning Signs of a Stroke

    F stands for face FACE: Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?
    A stands for arms ARMS: Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?
    S stands for speech SPEECH: Ask the person to repeat a simple phrase. Is their speech slurred or strange?
    T stands for time TIME: If you observe any of these signs, call 9-1-1 immediately.
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  4. #34
    Site Sponsor DaveMatthewsBand's Avatar
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    My wife and I would attend a CPR class for sure.
    This thread has prompted me to look into buying an AED.
    Thanks!
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  5. #35
    We would definitely attend a CPR (etc.) class. Would it be possible to offer this at the Rally?

    Another little preparedness task: When we pull into a campground, I locate the nearest hospital, fire dept., police dept., and walk-in clinic -- and jot down their phone #s and addresses, plus log them into my cell maps.

    Thanks for the reminder that beefing up our emergency, medical, and SHTF supplies and knowledge is on this year's must-do list. An AED, too. I was trained to use it at my work, but fortunately did not need to use it.
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  6. #36
    I notice that on the first page of this thread someone mention that giving breaths of air is no longer required. Not quite true. Also someone else mention that they haven't taken the CPR course since 2009 and was stating things that they had learned and/or knew. We have to be careful on what we state on this forum to others.

    As a coach on the high school level for the past 18 years I HAVE TO take CPR classes every two years. Just took the class again last month. The issue about giving breaths has come and gone several times since I have been taking the class. Last month they were teaching to give the burst of breaths again, however it was the individual option do to possible diseases that could be contracted. So this class was taught using the breath technics. However again, it was also stated by the instructor that it was going to be discontinued (again) in the teaching of the class this spring. Reason being blowing air our of your lungs into someone eases lungs would probably generate only 15% oxygen or less. Not of great value compare to risk factors.

    Even when I take these classes, which are on the base level, I run home to tell my wife (a registered nurse) all that I have learned again and she hits me with all kinds of information. First responders, nurses, doctors, and those in the medical field are taught a more advance procedures that we are at the base level.

    My point being is every two years that I take the class something changes even so slightly. Each class has a new improved (better) AED available with the cost continuing to come down. So yes, everyone should seek out a class and take the course. Even if you never need to preform CPR on a stranger, it may be a love one that will need you help.
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  7. #37
    Site Sponsor DaveMatthewsBand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vonzoog View Post
    I notice that on the first page of this thread someone mention that giving breaths of air is no longer required. Not quite true. Also someone else mention that they haven't taken the CPR course since 2009 and was stating things that they had learned and/or knew. We have to be careful on what we state on this forum to others.

    As a coach on the high school level for the past 18 years I HAVE TO take CPR classes every two years. Just took the class again last month. The issue about giving breaths has come and gone several times since I have been taking the class. Last month they were teaching to give the burst of breaths again, however it was the individual option do to possible diseases that could be contracted. So this class was taught using the breath technics. However again, it was also stated by the instructor that it was going to be discontinued (again) in the teaching of the class this spring. Reason being blowing air our of your lungs into someone eases lungs would probably generate only 15% oxygen or less. Not of great value compare to risk factors.

    Even when I take these classes, which are on the base level, I run home to tell my wife (a registered nurse) all that I have learned again and she hits me with all kinds of information. First responders, nurses, doctors, and those in the medical field are taught a more advance procedures that we are at the base level.

    My point being is every two years that I take the class something changes even so slightly. Each class has a new improved (better) AED available with the cost continuing to come down. So yes, everyone should seek out a class and take the course. Even if you never need to preform CPR on a stranger, it may be a love one that will need you help.
    Awesome points, thanks!
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