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Thread: MorRyde IS vs Roadmaster Slipper Springs

  1. #11
    Super Moderator Cate&Rob's Avatar
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    If we should decide that 100 years or so of suspension history using the equalizer between the springs is wrong . . . quoting from the Etrailer Q&A to explain that perspective . . . "Without the equalizer, the trailer will have a rougher ride and the weight won't be balanced across both axles when going over anything other than a flat surface. So potentially if you have 7000 lb trailer going over a bump with 2 , 3500 lb axles. When one axle is temporarily in the "air " the other axle will take on all the weight. That is why you don't see it too often. Equalizers are used to share the weight of the axles going over obstacles.”

    At the last Rally, I had considerable discussion with Sonny Dismuke. Sonny is the designer of the Liberty Rider slipper spring system http://www.rvimprovementsystems.com/...stallation.pdf. . . which looks to be essentially the same as the Roadmaster system (maybe just different marketing names?) I asked Sonny why his system didn’t need the load sharing from one axle to the other, but I didn’t get a clear answer. As I mentioned earlier, I don’t think anyone would design a slipper spring suspension with the slipper end leading . . . unless they were trying to compromise to fit existing equalizer attachment hangers.

    it is interesting that the “Cadillac” of suspensions systems, the MORryde independent, does not have load sharing between the axles.

    So . . . finally . . . to my question . . . Wouldn't it be easier (and cheaper) to design an adapter to the centre hanger that accepted shackle plates from the forward spring and the eye of the aft spring? The aft hanger would be modified to accept shacke plates from the aft spring. Thus we would have two independent axle suspensions and equal braking reaction at each axle. Whether to use a slipper design or a shackle design on the trailing end is a fine tuning thing . . . not a fundamental design thing.

    Its the 100 years of history on the equalizer design, that makes me think I might be missing something here .

    Rob
    Last edited by Cate&Rob; 12-29-2018 at 05:16 PM.
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    Rob,

    I equate the equalizer suspension system to ammonia based refrigeration - neither of which has changed too much since their initial implementation. Since these systems seem to work “good enough” there has been no real desire on part of the RV industry to make any real improvements. In the case of RV refrigerators, it boggles my mind that in this day and age(the fact that ammonia refrigeration is over 100 years old) that neither Dometic or Norcold can manufacturer a unit that is reliable.

    Trailer suspension systems in use today are simple and cheap(the later being what makes them so sexy to the RV manufacturers) so there no one is clamoring for a better system. Hell, most manufacturers won’t even make provisions for aftermarket shocks which certainly would dampen the jolts and lurches the trailer is subjected to as it is dragged down for what is called a modern highway but more resembles a logging trail in many states.

    The RV industry won’t even adopt modern manufacturing methodologies and are still assembling rigs the same way they did 75 years ago, albeit faster and utilizing cheaper materials. So no, I can’t put much stock that the equalizer suspension systems are more robust then a Mor Ryde or slipper spring alternatives because the continued use the of them is based on cost and sheer laziness of the RV industry to improve the product.
    Last edited by minnow101; 12-29-2018 at 05:51 PM.
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    Super Moderator howson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cate&Rob View Post
    I would agree with Pat's assessment of the Roadmaster. No one would design a slipper spring suspension with the slipper end leading . . . unless they were trying to compromise to fit existing equalizer attachment hangers.

    The other question that I have not figured out is that the equalizer supporters insist that the springs must be connected to share the load . . . and they have data for this. The slipper spring supporters insist that the springs must be isolated from each other . . . and they have data for that .

    From what I have figured out so far, I think one is better for travel (equalizer) and one is better for braking (slipper).

    Rob
    Same question I asked Pat on a different thread--what's your thoughts on this system?

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    Formerly patwardell Gyro Gearloose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cate&Rob View Post
    It is interesting that the “Cadillac” of suspensions systems, the MORryde independent, does not have load sharing between the axles.
    In a way I think independent may do a little load balancing because of the amount of travel they may have.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cate&Rob View Post
    So . . . finally . . . to my question . . . Wouldn't it be easier (and cheaper) to design an adapter to the centre hanger that accepted shackle plates from the forward spring and the eye of the aft spring? The aft hanger would be modified to accept shacke plates from the aft spring. Thus we would have two independent axle suspensions and equal braking reaction at each axle. Whether to use a slipper design or a shackle design on the trailing end is a fine tuning thing . . . not a fundamental design thing.

    Its the 100 years of history on the equalizer design, that makes me think I might be missing something here .

    Rob
    My thought on modifying current suspension uses something like an equalizer from a 3 axle setup and restricting its movement: https://www.etrailer.com/Trailer-Sus...e/TREQ105.html

    Missing anything..... The only major thing I think is, overslung springs change the way the equalizer setup applies forces. Overslung springs makes the axle act as a lever instead of being basically centered forces with undersluing springs. Just my take on it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cate&Rob View Post
    I would agree with Pat's assessment of the Roadmaster. No one would design a slipper spring suspension with the slipper end leading . . . unless they were trying to compromise to fit existing equalizer attachment hangers.

    The other question that I have not figured out is that the equalizer supporters insist that the springs must be connected to share the load . . . and they have data for this. The slipper spring supporters insist that the springs must be isolated from each other . . . and they have data for that .

    From what I have figured out so far, I think one is better for travel (equalizer) and one is better for braking (slipper).

    Rob
    Some of this would depend in how well the leading slipper end is captured on the Roadmaster system. After all, the equalizer system uses a leading shackle on the rear axle. For the travel question it would be interesting to know what MORryde or Roadmaster recommends for tires? Tires running at their max load capacity or moving to something better?
    Last edited by MidwestCamper; 12-29-2018 at 06:53 PM.
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    Super Moderator Cate&Rob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gyro Gearloose View Post
    Missing anything..... The only major thing I think is, overslung springs change the way the equalizer setup applies forces. Overslung springs makes the axle act as a lever instead of being basically centered forces with undersluing springs. Just my take on it.
    Pat,

    I think you correct in this assessment! The equalizer geometry makes sense with an underslung spring which is the "traditional" configuration. When flipped axles became the standard in the RV industry to gain tire clearance, nobody considered what this does to suspension reaction forces during braking.

    Rob
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    Looks like 0:16/0:29 the silent ride design results in some rear axle lift on braking. Otherwise its load sharing and looks to be very smooth.
    MidwestCamper

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    I have two heavy duty trailers I tow at work. One is a 14k dump trailer that uses two 7000 pound axles with a center equalizer and two slipper springs, both slippers face rear ward. The other trailer is a Haulmark Grizzly 28' enclosed cargo trailer, 14k capacity. This trailer has two 7000 lb dexter torsion axles. The torsion axles seem to work pretty good. No moving parts, fair suspension travel and fairly smooth ride.Torsion axles aren't really very expensive either. Do any of the RV trailer manufacturers offer torsion axles?
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    Site Sponsor Chiefblueman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nuffsaid View Post
    I have two heavy duty trailers I tow at work. One is a 14k dump trailer that uses two 7000 pound axles with a center equalizer and two slipper springs, both slippers face rear ward. The other trailer is a Haulmark Grizzly 28' enclosed cargo trailer, 14k capacity. This trailer has two 7000 lb dexter torsion axles. The torsion axles seem to work pretty good. No moving parts, fair suspension travel and fairly smooth ride.Torsion axles aren't really very expensive either. Do any of the RV trailer manufacturers offer torsion axles?
    Morryde torsion axles came on my 2007 Jayco Jayfeather 29N, GVW 6500lbs. The trailer sat pretty low, only needing 1 step at the entry. It rode and handled really well behind my Silverado SS 1/2 ton. Tires wore perfectly. Never had to replace anything, just service the wheel bearings. I'd certainly prefer torsion axles over the Prairie Schooner suspension on my GD. I don't know if they are feasible for larger trailers but they sure worked well on the Jayco.
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    Does the slipper spring option lift the trailer? I think the moryde lifts a couple inches, right? At 13'5" height on the solitude, I'm very concerned about going higher. Anyone have any thoughts on this? Thanks!
    Researching; Hoping to purchase soon; Thank you all for the info - been very helpful!!!

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